What’s wild this playoffs?

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In the beginning, God created man. And man created baseball. And man created a pennant to declare the winner of each season.
And man was not satisfied. So some man spun off another league, and called it the American League. And there was strife between the National League and the American League who was the best. So, man created the World Series. And all was well.
From the book of 2 Baseball 1:1-4

Well, that’s the basics of how our playoff system came out. In case you’re wondering, the book of 1 Baseball talks about the rules and how the game came into play, at least in my bible. The book of 2 Baseball covers up to the 80′s, so the Selig era seems to be missing. So let me cover the brief history of how baseball changed its playoff structure:
Starting in 1903, the World Series is formed between the NL and the AL. (Exceptions are 1904, and 1994). At this time, the winner of each league faces each other to determine the WS winner. In 1969, each league expands enough to have 2 divisions. There you have a league championship to determine the winner… also known as the pennant. The winner then is eligible for the World Series. 1981 was an anomaly year using a Divisional series. But the modern day divisional series started in 1995* when each league split into 3 divisions. In order to have an even number of teams play, the wild card was introduced. This would be the best team on each league who was not a division champion. Suddenly, games got more interesting. Then, Bud Selig rushed and added another wild card team this year. The winner of the 1 game wild card winner faces the best team in the league in the division series.

My take on all of this? I think (normally), the 2nd wild card was not needed. Now this second wild card would be in cases like 2007 when the Padres and Rockies were tied and had to play a play-in game. But that play-in game counted a regular season game!! Sorry, I also believe that 162 games is regular season, and any play-in games do not count for the record books. (This affects batting title, for example). In historical times, only having the best two teams win reminded me a lot like seeing the current wild card list: if you’re not at the top, then you have nothing to play for.

Now, having a season end like 2011 did takes a lot of luck by all the teams partaking. But I just looked at the standings, and found a disappointment at the time of this writing. The NL is all but locked up. All 5 players are just about decided. Only Washington hasn’t clenched the division yet (4 games over Atlanta, who holds the 1st Wild card lead by 6.5 over the Cardinals), and St. Louis has a 3.5 game lead over the Dodgers for the 2nd wild card. If there were only 1 wild card team, then it would be worse, St. Louis has no chance (and all teams chasing the Cardinals) have no shot at all.

Yet in the AL, nothing is decided yet. Every race is still fairly close enough. It may be worth watching till the very last day. And it looks like even if there wasn’t a 2nd wild card, the races are still competitive from those left playing.

While I’m not too pleased with the extra team, and possibly diluting the postseason, at least it’s not like the NHL or NBA where the top 8 of each conference make it, and extend playoffs for 2 months. However, the 1 game wild card playoff doesn’t fit in well with a best of 7 series the rest of the rounds use.

Either way, I’ll looking forward to the postseason, even if my Rockies were eliminated ages ago.

Thanks to @gorox1983 for contribution

* Technically, this happened in 1994, but the strike wiped out the rest of the season and the World Series. So 1995 was the first year of this system.
Source: Baseball almanac

American League, Baseball, National League, Uncategorized ,

The weakest link has been severed

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This season has been brutal for the Rockies, a complete embarrassment. The only thing that could be more embarrassing is if they do nothing about it.
–David Martin, on rockiesreview.com

You can say that again, as the team is already at 94 losses, 9 game losing streak, and 10 games left to play in this season. The question is not if they will make 100 losses, but when? And yet, is 100 going to do anything?

I had asked many people on twitter the one question I heard by Andrew Martin (@rockiesmagicnum) who mentioned this on Purple Row Radio (podcast). Is this Rockies organization missing the link from Keli McGregor? Everyone pretty much agreed that the answer is “yes”. Most felt that this was like being tripped at the top of a long stairwell. The first part hurt, but the further along the team got, the worse the tumble and the worse the injury is. After all, the team began a losing trend shortly after he passed away. Then some major changes happened in the 2012 season, including a trial oinking “piggyback pitcher” system, which was later all but abandoned. Then, a GM needs an assistant GM above Jim Tracy. Could there be any more radical changes? At least McGregor was a link between the front office and the players. But with this link severed, radical changes from O’Dowd were able to persist.

So I asked the next question: Do the Rockies need a new president (to fulfill McGregor’s place), fire O’Dowd, or both? This was unanimous as well. Both needs to be done. To be honest, Dick Monfort has already illustrated to us that he really doesn’t know Jack about a baseball team. In fact, put him in the crowds at Coors Field, and he’d be like a regular fan. So having a club president, even if he is hardly visible to the public, helped to keep some sort of order between the front office and the clubhouse. O’Dowd, I’ve blogged too much on him already, but he’s done too much workload for his work. That’s why he has an assistant GM between himself and Tracy. To be honest, if O’Dowd could do his job, he wouldn’t be so stressed out. But I believe he’s so out of touch with the club. He has to make excuses for everything that it’s pathetic. Why can’t he just tell the truth: The players he chose were not what he expected? So, I couldn’t even consider him to stay as GM, or even be promoted to President. Just let him go collect his mind while he can.

Interestingly enough, many people also thought Tracy should go as well. Yeah, with your season already in the dust as of May, and getting worse, what can you say? He wasn’t handed a good staff to manage. But having it be “ok” to lose is even worse. Maybe he got burned by O’Dowd’s joke of a lineup and his “out of the box” ideas. Or maybe he has been as bad as the critics say.

Either way, if you practically change your roster from one season to the next, and the team only performs worse, there’s a bad sign. I believe it’s time to start over. Flush the front office. Find a new president who can be that link that was cut. And then give O’Dowd and Tracy a nice vacation. … a long vacation, away from Colorado.

Contributions to today are (twitter names only): @Rockiesmagicnum @gstanwood @poseidonsfist @rockiesreview @townie813 @pixei @stars5steve @gorox1983 @trevor_irvine @capitulate

Baseball, Rockies

Rockies organization needs to grow a backbone

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This week was rather interesting. Yesterday, I planned to go to the bank, and then go buy me a ticket to the game next week. I’m on a strict budget and tickets were not in the plans. But I also didn’t plan on having $40 extra in my last paycheck, thanks to overtime. So, indeed, I could have spent that money on a ticket. At the end of the day, I didn’t get a ticket, and decided to put that extra money to use elsewhere. Why? There was another PR meltdown that happened earlier the same day that pretty much talked me out of it.

What happened is that Michael Cuddyer of the Rockies was nominated as the Rox candidate for the Robeto Clemente award. His choice of where the proceeds would go happens to be A precious child, one that was set up by Aurora Town Center victim* Jessica Ghawi and her co-worker at Mile High Sports, Peter Burns. So far, so good. But this turned sour because Mark Kiszla, columnist at the Denver Post, has ruffed some feathers with the front office. He has a second job at Mile High Sports, as an on-air personality. Where this becomes toxic is that the Rockies in turn, initially declined Peter Burns an opportunity to interview Michael Cuddyer on air. His intention was to give the guy some air time, promote the award, and which cause promote the charity that he’s in charge of managing. But the Rockies organization also released a message that they couldn’t support their guy openly for the nomination of the award.

Naturally, denying a member of the media an opportunity causes what we Americans know as “freedom of speech”, and it gets echoed both on the airwaves, and spills over to Twitter. As it spills onto social media, then everyone and their best friend’s cat knows what has happened, and now, a nomination is looking like a tainted (potential) hall of famer like Barry Bonds and Mark McGwire and possibly Roger Clemens. I don’t know if they finally changed their mind, but the point is, it doesn’t matter anymore.

Here’s the big problem: the front office put itself in the spotlight in a bad way. First of all, if your club is on pace to lose 100 games in a season, losing day in and day out, then yeah, you deserve criticism. After all, it was you who brought the players in. Some of the blame is shouldered on the players, no doubt. But it was your decision when it came to scouting, signing, and recruiting to your team. It’s not your ballpark, sitting at 5187 feet above sea level’s fault. Coors Field can’t tell the players to pitch and bat worse up here. Last I checked, it didn’t have legs, and it doesn’t have a voice. (Now the fans give it voice, and there is a voice of the Rockies, but that’s a different issue.) We as sports fans want to have to talk about something with our team. And all we see is the negatives, which is naturally what comes up. In the past, in the pre-Stanley Cup era in Denver (1996), or even pre-Rocktober (2007), Coloradoans would tend to not talk a lot of our teams, as if they were a minor team. You’d get a lot about the Broncos, because they are THE sports team this town’s ever known, but the rest would get shunted into silence. Not so anymore. But you can’t just block people from your twitter follows and from Toyota Talk, and even into your place just because they’re talking critical about your team. You have to earn it now.

If you really don’t like how you’re treated, you really need to prove it. Quit making excuses for your sorry team. Don’t use altitude or Coors Field as an excuse. Prove it by getting in quality. Once you finally do this, and produce quality teams, then everyone will have no excuse but to shut up, and admire the hard work to finally produce. And then it’s music to your ears.

Baseball, Rockies

Crazy train of a ride

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Well, I’ve got about 4 ideas that came down on the end of the year that I’m going to try to tie in together. It’ll feel like a crazy train ride going through this post as I’ve been on a similar ride. I know, I’m back on Monday/Thursday blogging till the end of the month, and then we’ll see what happens in October. Then, in October, I’ll post sporadically as the playoffs happen, because I think this will be a fun year. Read more »

Uncategorized

Carving out the pig

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As Troy Renck announced (along with others), the Rockies have abandoned the 4 man rotation effective immediately.

I wanted to post on Thursday, and if I did, it would have been about Strasburg, something that Patrick Saunders wrote about. But I didn’t have a full desire to blog on that. I wanted to give my best effort on posts I put feeling in. And this news has my total feeling in it.

Let’s put a comparison of the pitching systems we’ve had this year, not counting injuries. First of all, we start with a regular 5 man rotation. No pitch limit here, though fans know that 100p is a soft threshold. In June, the management comes up with an idea to go to a 4 man piggyback system. That meant 4 starting pitchers, getting a 75p limit, and then a “piggyback” reliever would rotate in, getting a 50p cap. The difference between a piggyback reliever and a normal reliever was the role they were in. They could be starters, but more likely they’d come in to pitch 2 or 3 innings before your back end relievers (specialty, hold and closers) would come in. That didn’t quite work out well. And now, they’ve announced that they are going back to a 5 man rotation and 3 “hybrid” (same as the piggyback) system. The starters have a 90-100p limit, and hybrids get a 45p limit. We’ve essentially gone full-circle….. sorta.

Let me get into this 4-man procedure a bit. During the months of May and June, the Rockies lost a lot of games. And by a lot, I mean a honking lot of them. Winning wasn’t even in their vocabulary, it seemed. It seemed that the pitchers couldn’t last 4 innings. So, GM Dan O’Dowd thought about trying a new system, since the Rockies had nothing to lose but more games. The piggyback system received lots of greasy fat reception from fans and media. The idea of having 4 starting pitchers is nothing new. In fact, before the modern 5 man rotation, pitchers used to have to pitch on 3 days rest when there was a 4 man rotation in the 70s and earlier. The pitch cap was also tried in the past, and pitchers generally hated it. Yet, combining this with a 2nd-string rotation of sorts made sense in the GM’s mind.

Maybe it made sense to him, but he only looked at it one way: How the team could conserve the pitcher’s work stress on the game. If one cuts down the breaks between days, and also the work load in the game, it would even out, right? That’s where I downright disagreed with it. For one thing, we have a lot of young pitchers on the team. That’ll happen when you have injures. But it was prone to cause problems, and indeed, some of the pitchers were pulled off with injuries. Friedrich was pulled out for the rest of the year with some injury. Drew Pomeranz was another concern, because at the beginning of the year, the team stressed that they’d limit his innings since he’s not had a full year in the majors. I heard it was something like 160 innings, or so. It wasn’t such a hard cap as Strasburg and the Nats (which I believe was a ridiculous issue in itself.) But the new rotation was proving to be a bit hard on him, causing a sore arm, which resulted in skipping every other start, and calling up a pitcher from AAA to spot-start, it seemed. Having Chacin back from an early injury may have also influence the change.

There was also another problem with this 4 man rotation. With a 75 pitch limit, most of our pitchers were unable to make it to the 5th inning, a criteria for starting pitchers in determining win stats. Granted, a win for a pitcher means garbage, but some are influenced because wins = money. It’s already hard that pitchers don’t want to come to Denver due to fear of the altitude affecting their pitches. A 4 man rotation would be harder to even persuade even trades or other free agent pitchers, and might cause a mass exodus by current starting pitching. Jim Tracy’s contract is up at the end of this year, and even if he doesn’t come back (which I still believe may be the case), they couldn’t recruit a new manager with this system in place.

Now, I’ll give credit that the GM was thinking outside the box on this one. After all, the team was just losing day in and day out, to the point where I was getting unmotivated with it. (Okay, my unmotivation came from other asinine GM decisions as well.) But really, the reasonings behind this unconventional idea was also wrong, as he tried to tie it to pitching at altitude. I could see this working at any place OTHER than Coors Field. Then there was the inconsistency behind this theory. Tracy started it, then relaxed on the limits. Then Geivett reinforced the idea, and then it was relaxed. Talk was about extending it till next year. Then they abandoned it altogether (saving the piggyback feature).

My personal take was that the announcement in itself was a terrible idea. However, if I was in this situation, I think I could accept a 4-man rotation on an ‘emergency’ basis. To put it honestly, if they said that instead of calling it an experiment, or “Project 5187″, that they said it was an emergency situation where it was a temporary fix (until they could get back to a 5 man), I’d probably be okay with it. They could probably call up a pitcher every other start to fill in for Pomeranz (much as that still hurts the affiliate). I really don’t know what else could have been possible, given the situation. We had Jeremy Guthrie who was really a wash, since he couldn’t adapt his mind to Coors Field situations. It was really one of those years.

This year was a wash out, but I just don’t get the actions of what O’Dowd did this year that ruined his credibility to the team and to the fans. Sure, we can’t actually kick him out without doing something illegal, but we can certainly vote with our pocketbooks. And that goes for any team with a stupid GM’s actions

Baseball, National League, Rockies , , , , , ,

September blues

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Well, welcome to September. The temperatures begin to fall. Baseball rosters expand to 40 players. And for teams not lucky enough to contend in the Fall Classic, it’s the beginning of the end. And some may start to feel blue about it.

I have not been to a Rockies game since June 12. Yes, this was right in the middle of the Rockies catastrophe. The pitcher was Jeremy Guthrie, one who was a major contributing factor in the downfall. But it was just one of the factors leading up to the switch in pitching mentality by the Rockies front office. Yeah, I missed the Jeff Francis signing, and the “piggyback pitchers” by that time. I was just sick of going to games only to see the Rockies lose. The change done at the higher level were ones that I disagreed with, and made me determined not to see another Rox game in person until they change upper management.

Sadly, I want to go see another game, despite my boycott. But I know that the boycott is useless, as the changes set this year are going to be implemented next year as well. I’d really like to see one of the last games of the season just to “close out baseball”. And yet I’m really stuck between a rock and a hard place. I’m sure I’m not alone here, as I talked to Sackor about this earlier this week.

I guess I’ll leave it to my readers here: Would you just give in, knowing that whatever changes your team might have done is going to be around for a longer time, or do you still hold grudges? Or would you go, with a different feeling in mind?

Now, I know I have not had the greatest work schedule, which also contributed to my lack of showing up. Yet it wasn’t the main factor. Maybe I’ll just bite the bullet and choose one of the last 3 home games to see. If you are interested, maybe we can make a mini-tweetup for it. Let me know on my twitter feed (@druidlove).

As an epilogue, the sport normally to succeed baseball (not football, but hockey), seems very likely not to happen, at least in the NHL. So, this would be some therapy to get ready for a hell freezing over winter. :)

Thanks to @Supahfly318 for contribution, and also to @AyanaPipio, who probably has the same thoughts I have about this.

Rockies , ,

Year of the crazy manager

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Okay, I think I’ve echoed my concern enough of the things I don’t like in Dan O’Dowd. Yeah, the news is out that the Rockies will continue this “piggyback” paired pitching system into next year (despite the fact that Tracy Ringolsby already announced this last week) is disgusting, but I’ve already ranted too much on this. After all I am just a fan, and I don’t know anything–except to other fans. And that’s fine with me. But O’Dowd is not the only GM who has done crazy stuff. In fact, I think it’s a syndrome across the whole league. This is the year of the crazy manager.

Let me illustrate this by bringing up some teams that have made poor decisions:

* The Washington Nationals: for their decision to shut down Stephen Strasburg no matter what. I can understand them playing with eggshells with Strasburg after coming back from TJ surgery. But as I talked with Mike Casey (@mikecasey24) about it, we both agree that shutting him down is ridiculous. There could have been some better ideas tossed around, like skipping a start, or optioning him, or something, or even just let him pitch the year. The Nats are going to make the playoffs, unless something ridiculous happens, and not having your star pitcher in postseason will suck.

* Los Angeles Dodgers: Money does not always buy championships. I’m sure a lot of this was newly founded owner Magic Johnson wanting to ensure Dodger fans that Dodgers will contend to win every year. A nine player trade with the Boston Red Sox, and over $200 million later, they find their first 2 games are at Coors Field. Ironically, in one of the worst years for the Rox, the bats show up for purple in time to silence the men in blue. Money does talk, but all I know is that it says “goodbye” to me.

* Houston Astros: Firing their manager. This is like burning bridges when your manager is already walking over a huge chasm filled with alligators at the bottom. It just doesn’t make sense. You’ve already built a bad team, and just trying to make it look like the manager is at fault. I don’t get it.

* Boston Red Sox: Bobby Valentine. He could basically write a blog with his vocal opinions that could rival this post. Nuff said.

* Miami Marlins: I really shouldn’t include Ozzie Guillen on this list, but his remark about Castro, and then getting a 6 game suspension by the team probably sums it up. Interestingly enough, in another half-ass move, they bought lots of superstars, only to give them away midseason. What’s the logic on this? That’s already 2 strikes there, what’s the 3rd one?

* Colorado Rockies: If you don’t know, you haven’t read my blog this year. :P

I think with all the managers putting their feet in their mouths this year, maybe we should give them some Ivory soap so they can wash their mouths out and be nice and squeaky clean for next year?

Thanks in part to Mike Casey (@mikecasey24) for contributions to today’s blog

From the Clubhouse

It does make you wonder what happened to the Rockies this year. They started good, then crashed and burned. Then they’re charging out of the abyss with feeling. It does make you wonder why the Rox need to crash in the first place. Did they really need Geivett to give moral support? Did the pitching staff really needed the shakeup? Do we really need to have a AAA team out on the field instead of overpaid lazy professionals?

Don’t get me wrong. I’m always happy when my team gets a win, shuts out a rival, goes on a hot streak, or even sweeps a team. It hasn’t happened that much this year that it feels like Christmas day when it happens. But maybe it’s getting a RC car instead of the keys to a Lexus sitting in your garage kind of feeling is what I have right now. Maybe I can ask Father O’Dowd (no, not as a reverend, but wearing a red suit like Santa Claus) if I can exchange present would be better. Then again, I don’t know if I want to take the chance and get zonked instead. I’ll settle for what I have now, and just hope that next year, I can see something better. In the meantime, I’ll play Powerball, and write Santa to give me a Lexus next year. And a NL pennant and a World Series trophy.

American League, Baseball, National League, Rockies , , ,

A team full of oinks and quacks

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Once upon a time, at least before Spring Training started, the Rockies had this ideal lineup. These were their starting pitchers of choice:
Jhoulys Chacin
Jorge De la Rosa *
Juan Nicasio
Jeremy Guthrie
Drew Pomeranz**

Unfortunately, JDLR would not be ready until (rumored) end of May at the earliest, so another pitcher would fit in that role as a stopgap measure. It turned out with the arsenal of pitchers Dan got, we had to use Jamie Moyer in that role. Also, the Rox were concerned about Drew that they didn’t want to overwork him. So he got a start in the Springs until we needed a 5th pitcher, and even then, there was talks about limiting Pomeranz’ workload to a soft cap (as opposed to the hard innings cap the Nationals are placing on Stephen Strasburg.) So life is grand, we go .500 through April.

Then all hell broke loose. Chacin underperforms, and eventually is on the DL (after nearly getting optioned). JDLR has setbacks in his rehab starts, and spends the entire season on the DL. Nicasio gets hit again, and is gone for the year. Guthrie spends time on the DL early on, and cannot throw a ball for strike to save his life. Moyer is cut for similar reasons. Eventually the rest of the position players see time on the DL. What a mess.

Then in the middle of June, Dan O’Dowd, through his puppet Jim Tracy, announces that the Rockies are switching their pitching. The change would involve a 4 man starting pitching rotation with a hard 75 pitch limit. After this, there’s a “piggyback” pitcher (who might be a starter, or a reliever), with a 50 pitch limit, before going to relievers. When this broke out, most of MLB fans and analysts laughed. Rockies fans groaned and despised this radical thinking.

Dan O’Dowd had in his reason, declared that he had always thought of this idea, but could not put it in effect because the 2007 and 2009 years were successful for the team. It took an entire pitching meltdown for O’Dowd to put this in play. His logic was also flawed in that altitude takes a toll on arms, and this would help save the pitching arms. I can understand trying to think outside the box, but this is truly Orwellian of O’Dowd to mention this.

At first, there was no real difference. In fact, the starters were being pulled by the 3rd or 4th inning, while the relievers were actually getting worse. The Rox were losing almost every game, and were looking to hit 110 or more losses. In fact, there were even more pitchers hitting the DL, as well as the rest of the starting position players, like Tulo and Helton and Cuddyer. Then, when everyone gave up, the team started to win. They regained Jhoulys Chacin this week, and helped to sweep the Mets. Suddenly, some people think this rotation may stick, including Tracy Ringolsby.

I don’t mind the out of the box thinking. But the only one who is living high on the hog is O’Dowd himself (and I think he’s a bit quacked here.) I think a lot of this uptick has been to the offense, and especially with the bench guys getting more play time due to the regulars on the DL. But, I sure hope O’Dowd is satisfied with his current pitching staff. Because he’s not going to get any who will want to come here. Sure, it was already hard to get pitchers to come to Denver. But no pitcher will want to come now with the basis that they will have 3 days to rest instead of 4. The other factor is that with this rotation, they are basically ruining Drew Pomeranz. He wasn’t supposed to be getting this workload because he has not had a full season in the majors before. And signs that he has to have his rotation skipped are not great signs. In fact, this is actually counter to O’Dowd’s theory. His theory of the 4-man rotation may work for any other team except the Rox. (The 4 man rotation was a norm through the 70s).

As for me, I’ll still root for the Rockies. I’m always happy when they win. But deep down inside, I guess I don’t like being lied to, and I felt that Dan O’Dowd has broken a lot of my respect with his doublespeak. There’s only a couple weeks left before the September callups, and even with the season being lost for this team, we’re playing for next year. Let’s not try to ruin any more players, and go back to a traditional 5 man rotation, so we can indeed show the rest of the MLB that baseball can be played while being high–a mile high that is.

Thanks to @RockiesReview and @bertjanb for contribution to today’s blog

Around the horn

Players like Melky Cabrera are what gives a black mark to MLB. Everyone agrees in playing a fair game. And doing drugs is unacceptable. But lying about it is even worse. I hope he spends time behind bars… and I mean years. Don’t make the excuse that he’s a professional athlete–because he’s not. He’s not acting professional about it at all. Sorry, rant over.

Baseball, Rockies , , , , , , ,

Something doesn’t fit

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Well, as with last week, the Rockies were pretty much giving wins to their opponents. Helton is gone for the rest of the year, and Friedrich was out for the rest of the year as well. This new idea that seems to be coming from a bunch of crackheads is showing itself as the worst idea of an already fragile pitching staff.

Then, Chavez Ravine called the Rockies, threatening with its teeth to crunch and bury the Rox alive. Traditionally, this place has not been the most friendly to the Rox. With a season the men in purple are having, it could be another snooze-fest for the fans already disenfranchised. But yet, they ended up winning 2-0 on Monday. It was incredible. Tuesday, they came back with a 3-1 win, and won the series. This was seen as a miracle. In most years, this was a great thing, and fans would hope to bring out their brooms for a series sweep. This year, the expectation has fallen faster than the mercury falls in Vail during the winter, to where winning back to back games is seen as a miracle. There was some hope for a series sweep.

Their last sign of life is probably best illustrated by a pic I tweeted while I was at Lakeside yesterday. Picture hosted on instagram. I was like going crazy, while I was waiting to get in the Skoota Boats (to get cooled down). I saw the instant replay on At Bat, and was thinking… “Go speed racer, go.” This was incredible. I guess I cooled off just like the Rox, and the Rockies would end up losing 6-4.

So, were these 19 innings an aberration? Maybe. In a normal season, we’d be happy for 2 wins, and this, and we could move on with the next game. This year, just trying to avoid 100 losses is going to be looked up as a miracle. I’m looking forward to hockey, and next year already. But that won’t stop me from listening to baseball games, and tracking the Rockies progress.

Uncategorized

Death of the Rox… and blog changes

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Wow, I didn’t know that the Grim Reaper has taken a position as president. Yeah, this is a special edition of this blog. I can’t help it that this week has been the worst week I can ever recall in sports history in this city. I have a song I’d like to dedicate to the Rockies, with apologies to Simon & Garfunkel:

Read more »

Baseball, Rockies